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Author Topic: Jazz language
jpdim
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Post Jazz language
on: August 2, 2011, 03:03
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I'm thinking about the changes in jazz language or improvisation language.
IF we compare what Rosenwinkel or Adam Rogers might play over a standard compared to what Jim Hall or Wes Montgomery might have played- what differences are there? I've been listening to a lot of the post 2000 guitar notables
Rosenwinkel, Rogers, Bernstein, Moreno, Heksleman, Muller etc Some sound more "straight ahead" than others. There is a variety of factors here. Technique, compositional style, education experiences etc There obviously is no judgement we can make that is true for all, however, i do sense that the jazz style has mutated greatly in the last 10 - 15 years. This later crew of modern players were most likely greatly influenced by Scofield, Metheny, Abercrombie, Stern.

I would be interested to hear any thoughts, observations in regards to the above.

John

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Perkins
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Post Re: Jazz language
on: August 9, 2011, 04:24
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I think that the general advancement in the levels of just raw technique that has happened over the last 20 years have made it so guitar players have the chops to play things that previously only horn or piano players could play. I know that Frank Gambale developed his sweep picking abilities to accommodate the Michael Brecker solos that he wanted to be able to play at tempo. I think that modern guitar players just have a higher technique bar set for them than the Jim Hall and Kenny Burrell generation, and so they just find a way to rise to the challenge. It's very true that the instructional materials and schools that are available to players coming up now are just light years beyond what the guitarists of the 50s and 60s had.

jpdim
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Post Re: Jazz language
on: August 9, 2011, 05:02
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Of course we acknowledge that players like Pass. Martino, Farlow, Benson had great technique and they are all 'old school'. Which now begs the question, is the language on guitar more evolved now than previously? Is there more harmonic detail in the line?
I did listen to a podcast interview with Mike Monero who talks about his experiences in high school which was very "Arts" orientated. In that he was playing in jazz ensembles very early in his development. You make a very interesting point about the influence of instructional materials and schools available today.

Scot-
Gormley
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Post Re: Jazz language
on: August 27, 2011, 14:11
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When I think of the "modern" sound, several things come to mind: (1) triad pairs/hexatonics, (2) superimposed pentatonics, (3) extensive use of min6th pentatonic, and (5) harmonic major harmony. The older school of playing (which I love, by the way), in my opinion, involved more harmonic generalization.

jpdim
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Post Re: Jazz language
on: August 31, 2011, 10:39
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What is meant by Harmonic Major Harmony? I'm not quite sure.
Another device I am noticing is the use of Metric Subdivision in the Rhythm Section.
ie Mike Moreno head of Isotope or the head of Yesterdays by Adam Rogers.
It's an interesting subject.

Scot-
Gormley
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Post Re: Jazz language
on: September 5, 2011, 11:07
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John, re: Harmonic Major.

Think of a Harmonic Minor scale, and raise the 3rd.
G-A-Bb-C-D-Eb-F# = Harmonic Minor
G-A-B-C-D-Eb-F# = Harmonic Major

One of the cool things about Harmonic Major is it generates both a 9th and a 13th over a m7b5 chord (as compared to b9 and 13 if Harmonic Minor is used (Mode II-Locrian #6); or a 9th and b13 if Locrian #2 is used).

Harmonic Major is most frequently used over a Dim/Maj7th chord (e.g., F# triad/G bass note; used as a sub. for a Maj. 7th chord) in modern harmony.

Mike Moreno is a seriously bad cat! Love his playing.

jpdim
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Post Re: Jazz language
on: September 8, 2011, 02:33
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Scot: Thanks for the clarification.
My focus at present is upon the players we've been talking about and their playing on standards. One similarity also that I find is in their articulation.

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